Search

COL Kirby Gross, MD- Heeding the Call of Duty After 9/11

Updated: Aug 5

COL (Dr.) Gross joined the Army at 48 years old while in a thriving general surgery practice to do his part following the 9/11 attacks. 20 years later, he is still on active duty deploying with special forces and conventional units 10 times, totaling over 5.5 years. He received his MD at Indiana University School of Medicine and completed his General Surgery residency at Indiana University Medical Center. He also completed a Surgical Critical Care Fellowship at Vanderbilt University. He currently works with the Army Medical Department Military Civilian Trauma Team Training Program at Cooper University Hospital, Camden NJ.

In this episode, he shares how he sought to become an expert expeditionary surgeon and participated in the Afghanistan and Iraq wars for the past 20 years. He discusses his experience with all phases of the conflict, his primarily clinical military career, and how he seeks to train the next generation of expeditionary surgeons.


The WarDocs Mission is to improve military and civilian healthcare and foster patriotism by honoring the legacy, preserving the oral history, and showcasing career opportunities, experiences, and achievements of military medicine.



The interview with Dr. Gross is available on all major podcast platforms. Here are some popular links that will bring you directly to the episode:

Apple: https://apple.co/3QaSfEL

Spotify: https://spoti.fi/3Jki2Z9


Find out more and join Team WarDocs- www.wardocspodcast.com


Listen to the What We are For Episode 47. https://bit.ly/3r87Afm

WarDocs- The Military Medicine Podcast is a Non-Profit, Tax-exempt-501(c)(3) Veteran Run Organization run by volunteers. All donations are tax-deductible, and 100% of donations go to honoring and preserving the history, experiences, successes, and lessons learned in military medicine. A tax receipt will be sent to you.


WARDOCS documents the experiences, contributions, and innovations of all military medicine Services, ranks, and Corps who are affectionately called "Doc" as a sign of respect, trust, and confidence on and off the battlefield that demonstrates dedication to the medical care of fellow comrades in arms.


Follow Us on social media

Twitter: @wardocspodcast

Facebook: WarDocs Podcast

Instagram: @wardocspodcast